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Sofia Imad

Junior Fellow

Sofia is a Junior Fellow at Artha Global, where she works on public health. She is also a founding member of the Women’s Indian Chamber of Commerce and Industry India-EU Business Council and on the editorial board of Public Health Open Access. Prior to joining Artha, Sofia managed global health programs, with a focus on infectious diseases, in the public and private sectors. She worked for Sanofi, based out of Singapore and Mumbai, where she launched a new drug for tuberculosis in Asian countries. Previously, she worked with The MENTOR Initiative as a Program Director for malaria and neglected tropical diseases in Chad and Angola. She was also a member of an international academic network on the Israeli-Palestinitian conflict and organised educational programs in the region.

Sofia holds a Masters degree in International Relations from Sciences Po Bordeaux and a Master of Public Health from the Pasteur Institute in Paris.

 

 

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